Solid waste management-POSTER SESSION

[CEST2019_00107] Detection of Alpha-induced Radioluminescence in the Ultraviolet C Range for Nuclear Decommissioning Applications
by Crompton A.J., Gamage K.A.A.

The close range of traditional alpha radiation detectors makes detection time-consuming and potentially hazardous. Alpha-induced radioluminescence in the ultraviolet C (UVC) wavelength range (180-280 nm) may be the mechanism through which stand-off detection can be achieved. The UVTRON (Hamamatsu) solar-blind flame sensor is sensitive to photons of wavelengths between 185 – 260 nm and has a low background count due to the absorption of natural UVC in the atmosphere. It has successfully detected a 210Po source of 6.95 MBq from 20 mm distance, and flowing gases over the source, especially xenon, has shown the signal can be significantly increased. As a mature technology, which is small, robust, low-cost and easily available, the UVTRON would be ideal for inclusion in a scanning, stand-off, alpha detection system. It has been shown, however, to be sensitive to gamma and beta radiation and this would need to be taken into account in any system design. However, that this sensor can be used in normal lighting conditions makes it a potential candidate for stand-off alpha detection in field conditions, and results of distance, scanning and detection experiments support this.

Saturday
Poster presentation in Solid waste management-POSTER SESSION
[CEST2019_00201] Characterisation of Rare Earth Elements in Waste Printed Circuit Boards (WPCBs) and their bioleaching potential
by Gonzalez-Baez A., Pantoja Munoz L., Garelick H., Purchase D.

Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are part of everyday items such as cellular phones and computers, and they constitute a significant proportion of e-waste. PCBs contain hazardous components but also valuable and critical materials such as copper, gold, silver and rare earth elements. Rare earth elements (REE) are crucial to modern hardware and due to their increasing demand and high supply risk, they are now considered to be amongst the most critical elements in the world. In this research, WPCBs were supplied by local recycling companies after crushing/grinding process and metal analysis of the material was carried out. The concentration of the REE and their distributions in particle sizes is determined, and the potential of WPCBs for REE bioleaching is also discussed.

Thursday
Poster presentation in Solid waste management-POSTER SESSION
[CEST2019_00856] A new sustainable approach in recovering Cobalt from “hard metal” production by-products
by Oumarou Amadou A., De Gaudenzi G.P., Marcheselli G.C., Piredda M., Serpe A.

The present work shows the capability of Maleic Acid solutions to tune the amount of Co in cemented carbide-based recovery powders with a Co content exceeding the threshold (10% Co) for industrial manufacturing in Hard Metal production and required by safety regulations. Maleic acid solutions react promptly and selectively in very mild conditions (0.5M, room temperature and pressure, EtOH as solvent) with Co contained in WC-Co sintered powders obtaining the [Co(Mal)2(H2O)4] compound almost quantitatively. Characterization of the resultant recovery powders (SEM-EDS, XRD) and reaction solutions (ICP-OES) after treatments confirmed the almost complete Co removal and high leaching efficiency. Recovery powders deprived of Co demonstrated proper quality to be re-employed in the production process. These results seem really promising in providing a novel, tunable and effective remediation of this hazardous industrial waste and preserve raw material depletion.

Thursday
Poster presentation in Solid waste management-POSTER SESSION